Mrs Claus is an Engineer

I walked to the mailbox with my seven-year-old daughter tonight the same way we do every day. Usually there is nothing exciting in the box. But today when we looked through the mail we found a letter from Santa!

She was elated.

She ran back to the house, and as soon as she was inside she ripped the letter open.

She noticed it started with “Hello Friend HerName” and she said to me that Santa must have lots of friends all over the world. If I am his friend then all the other kids are too!

She devoured the letter. She let out gasps of excitement and she laughed at other parts.

Then came this:

Mrs. Claus asked me to say “Hi.” She’s busy in the workshop fixing our toy-making machine. She has a degree in engineering from the North Pole University, so we rely on her when things act up.

Her eyes lit up! Her dream is to become a toy maker when she is older. She was excited to hear that Mrs. Claus was an engineer.

When she was heading to bed she said that when she is older she was going to write Santa and ask him for a job as a toy engineer at the North Pole.

This letter got her excited about becoming an engineer. It is exactly this type of thing that more girls need to see and hear often when they are growing up. They need role models. They need to see that STEM jobs are the kinds of jobs they can do.

Thanks Santa for making my Christmas wish come true. (and to the helpers at Canada Post :-) ).

UPDATE: My daughter left a note for Santa last night asking if she could be a toy engineer at the North Pole. He said if she worked really hard at school and went to university to be an engineer then yes she could come work at the North Pole. At this she jumped up and down in excitement!


PS. After I wrote this, CBC radio wanted to find out more about Mrs. Claus’ career as an engineer. So they phoned Chief postal elf to find out more about it.


If you liked this one check out this awesome story about Mrs. Claus saving Christmas by writing an app for Santa to use.

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